What Password Rules Are You Guilty of Breaking?

Password rules

“Do as I say, not as I do.” Are you an offender of doing this? Even as we tell our users to practice proper digital security, we’re not always putting our own lessons to practice.

Here’s a list of common password transgressions that many of us are guilty of breaking from time to time, even as we wrap our users over the knuckles for them

1. Sharing Passwords.

Sometimes, you’re in a rush to get things done and the user in question is a trusted colleague. Until they get busted doing something with a password only you should have. Whoops.

2. Reusing Passwords.

Password reuse

Using the same password for all your users with a slight variation, or the same things for your personal and work accounts?

3. Storing Passwords in Unsafe Locations

… Like in your unlocked desk drawer, for instance. And then someone goes to borrow your notepad. Admin access!

4. Setting your password to never expire.

If it ain’t broke, why fix it, right? (Answer: Wrong!)

5. Way too simple passwords.

Like someone’s birthday. Or 12345. Or Monk3y. Nobody will ever guess it.

The worst passwords
Top offenders: Any of these look familiar?

6. Blank Passwords.

Please. Just no.

7. Storing all passwords in “the Cloud”.

News flash: The cloud is just someone else’s computer, accessible by the internet. Not the most secure place.

8. Literally using ‘Password’ as your password.

password hiding

If anyone does this, they deserve to be sprayed with a water bottle. Bad user. NO.

9. Keeping passwords on post-it notes.

It’s secure so long as there’s nobody around with eyes.

10. E-mailing passwords to yourself.

Because an inbox can never be compromised by people looking for higher levels of access.

Don’t rely solely on digital security to protect you from slip-ups: make sure your data is properly backed up! BackupAssist offers reliable backup & disaster recovery for SMBs. Read more.

Leave a Comment

Share on email
Share on print
Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Join 1,874 other subscribers